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NetworkEd: Technology in Education

A seminar series organised by LSE’s Learning Technology & Innovation team (LTI). The series invites speakers from education, computing and related fields to discuss how technology is shaping the world of education.

Technological developments, particularly the internet, have led to changes in the way institutions can deliver teaching, but are also impacting on students’ skills and their expectations of higher education. The seminar series is live streamed to enable an audience from around the world to listen and participate online.  Recordings of the events are then available to watch on YouTube

Upcoming seminars 2016/17

1 March 2017 – Professor Robert Allison, Vice-Chancellor and President of Loughborough University
More details coming soon

Previous seminars (for videos click on the links)

23 November 2016 – James Clay ‘Mapping learning and teaching’ 

5 October 2016 – Alison Powell “What does Big Data look like? ‘A data walkshop’” (no recording available)

2015/16

18 May 2016 – Alison Powell – “What does Big Data look like? ‘A data walkshop’” (no recording available)

20 January 2016 – Bonnie Stewart – ‘Academic Twitter: The Intersection of Orality & Literacy in Scholarship?‘ See our Q&A with Bonnie Stewart Slides are available here

16 December 2015 – Panel featuring Prof. Conor Gearty, Darren Moon, Paul Sullivan – Harnessing the power of the ‘Massive’

12 November 2015 – Maggie Philbin – Tea, Tech and Teens

16 September 2015 – Dr Donna Lanclos – Networked2020:The London University

2014/15

20 May 2015 – Women in technology panel
Q&A with Dr Ellen Helsper Chair of the Women in technology panel

4th March 2015 – Student Entrepeneur Panel

25 February 2015 – Professor Sonia livingstone (Media and communications, LSE)

28th January 2015 – Leslie Haddon – On children using smartphones
Q&A with Leslie Haddon

14 January 2015 – Professor Matthew Connelly – On hacking the archive
Q&A with Matthew Connelly

5th November 2014 – Marieke Guy – ‘What does open data have to do with education?
Q&A with Marieke Guy

5th November 2014 – Helen Keegan – On interactive and social media
Q&A with Helen Keegan

22nd October 2014 -Josie Fraser – ‘Digital Literacy and practice, making change happen

2013/14

09 July 2014 – Stephen Downes
Stephen Downes works for the National Reserach Council of Canada and has been a Senior Researcher since 2001. He is widely recognized to have taught (with George Siemens) the first Connectivist MOOC, and has long been a distinct voice in the field of technology and pedagogy.  His blog OLDaily, is the sector’s go-to site for considered & critical musings about the use of computers and the web in education.A video of the talk by Stephen Downes can be found on our Youtube channel.


22 January 2014, Dr Sylvester Arnab, Coventry University “Games for Learning”
This talk will touch on innovating pedagogy by using game science and technology to support teaching and learning. Some examples will be demonstrated and evidences of efficacy in different contexts will be discussed. The potential of a game-based approach in conjunction with other initiatives, such as MOOCs, flipped classroom, crowd learning and citizen inquiry will also be explored in this talk.

30 April 2014, Dave White, University of Oxford, “What exactly do your students get up to online?” While we might not want to know *everything* students get up to online it would be useful to know how they go about using the Web to learn. This presentation will draw on the outputs from the Jisc funded ‘Visitors and Residents’ and ‘Digital Student’ project to explore emerging digital practices and how they are influencing students perceptions of the role of the institution. It will then outline how the Visitors and Residents mapping process can be used to gain an understanding of how and why students are choosing to engage with their institutions (or not) online. This will include a brief review of a Higher Education Academy project which is currently supporting 17 institutions across the UK in the use of the mapping process as they seek to meet and manage students’ expectations of the digital environment.

11 December 2013, Marc Wells, Imperial College London “Innovation via a Thin LMS: A middleware alternative to the traditional learning management system” Demonstration and discussion to show how a so-called “middleware” software solution, originally developed to enable course materials to be delivered to tablet devices, eventually replaced an incumbent ‘monolithic’ VLE at a Business School in the UK. This middleware solution is termed a ‘Thin LMS’ and consists primarily of software that integrates data and materials from other information systems hosted by the institution.

13 November 2013, Martin Hawksey, Association for Learning Technology, “What the little birdy tells me: Twitter in education” Since the launch of the micro-blogging service Twitter in 2006 a number of academics have experimented with its use within education. Examples range from the passive/monologic course announcements to the active/dialogic directed discussion. This workshop will explore some educational ‘Twitter hacks’ which cover a wide range of activities from a free SMS broadcast system, Twitter for classroom voting and the application of social network analysis to for mining Twitter for actionable insights. As part of this participants will be shown a range of free and open source tools to assist in Twitter data collection and analysis including the Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheet (TAGS) and NodeXL. Martin Hawksey has extensive experience of supporting innovation in teaching and learning within further and higher education working for a number of national advisory services and is currectly affliated to the Association for Learning Technology (ALT). His current work covers multiple aspects of open education and digital scholarship, his knowledge of social networks and analytics being applied in a number varying contexts including open online courses. Martin regularly develops ad hoc tools for collecting and analysing data shared on his personal blog MASHe.

5 February 2013, Karine Le Joly, HEC Paris, “Using ipads in Executive Education” As our students and participants adopt new ways of living and studying, technologies and behaviours that were still confined within the borders of private life are rapidly penetrating the world of higher education. More specifically, learning has become more mobile, with rising expectations to access information and content anytime and anywhere. Karine will present HEC Executive Education initiative to develop the use of the iPad in various programs. She will share her “going mobile” ongoing story, including objectives, achievements … and pending doubts and questions. In this session, we will consider the perspective of the individual educator, concerned with the evolution of his/her teaching methods, and examine various app environments to promote active teaching and learning both inside and outside of the classroom. Participants will obtain ideas for planning mobile initiatives and for integrating the use of iPads into curricula and pedagogy. The session will be as interactive as possible for participants to share their experience and views, and practice various apps (bring your iPad to play along). As our students and participants adopt new ways of living and studying, technologies and behaviours that were still confined within the borders of private life are rapidly penetrating the world of higher education. More specifically, learning has become more mobile, with rising expectations to access information and content anytime and anywhere. Karine will present HEC Executive Education initiative to develop the use of the iPad in various programs. She will share her “going mobile” ongoing story, including objectives, achievements … and pending doubts and questions. In this session, we will consider the perspective of the individual educator, concerned with the evolution of his/her teaching methods, and examine various app environments to promote active teaching and learning both inside and outside of the classroom. Participants will obtain ideas for planning mobile initiatives and for integrating the use of iPads into curricula and pedagogy. The session will be as interactive as possible for participants to share their experience and views, and practice various apps (bring your iPad to play along).

2012/13

26th June, 2013, Various, LSE “Exploring Social Media as Data Sources for Research – internal LSE workshop (no video)

29th May 2013 Anne-Wil Harzing, University of Melbourne, Australia “Using Google Scholar and Publish or Perish to measure research impact” This presentation will show how online access of the academic literature through Google Scholar can be used to develop sophisticated metrics of academic research impact. We review various measures of research impact, but focus mainly on citation analysis. First, we will discuss why every academic should be interested in citation analysis. Subsequently, we review why it is important to complement the traditional subscription-based source of citation data – Thomson ISI’s Web of Science or Scopus – with Google Scholar. In the second part of the presentation, we will cover the use Google Scholar as a source for citation analysis in some detail. It will show how to track your own citations, which citation metrics to use and how to present your case. This part of the presentation will involve a demonstration of the use of the software program “Publish or Perish”.

17th April 2013 Lindsey Jordan, University of the Arts, “Needs of the distance learner” Distance learning courses have always struggled to hold on to their students and steer them through to successful completion. While the Internet provides institutions with the tools to incorporate interactivity, group work and new forms of content, many of the factors contributing to distance learner dropout remain unaddressed, and the personality profile of the successful distance learner has altered very little. This workshop will explore the needs of the modern distance learner, and how they can be met in the current distance education landscape, including the rise of the MOOC in its various guises.

6th March 2013, Ellen Helsper, LSE “Value and practice of social networks and social media in education Social media are used heavily by most students, the question is whether these should therefore have a place in education and whether there are limits to what they can do. This talk will be a dialogue between practical experience as a teacher and the research that Ellen has been involved in in relation to the use of (social) media by different social groups. Under the assumption that education aims to be inclusive and improve or create enjoyment in learning some of the benefits and pitfalls of using social media in education will be discussed. The talk will be based on research regarding how different generations learn using new media, what we can learn from young people’s use of and capabilities in using social media and what we know about the adults that are educating these young people and the importance of social networks (in the traditional sense) in creating a comfortable online learning environment. Research from the EU Kids Online project (EUKidsonline.net) and the World Internet Project (worldinternetproject.net) will form the basis of the discussion, and Ellen will illustrate them by using personal experiences of using social media in higher education.

6th February 2013 Cathie Jackson, Janet Finlay and Joe Nicholls, Cardiff University, “Putting Digital and Information Literacy into Practice (Digidol Project)” In combination with academic literacies, digital and information literacies represent a broad spectrum of knowledge and skills that ideally should be developed as an integral part of subject specific learning. The challenge at an institutional level is helping academic staff and students achieve this in a manner that is fully integrated and sustainable. As part of the JISC funded Digidol Project (http://digidol.cardiff.ac.uk) at Cardiff University work is being done to create a common framework and methodology to enable professional services staff, academic staff and students to arrive at a shared understanding of what literacies are required and how they can best be realised through meaningful learning and teaching practices.

5th December 2012 Carl Miller, “Demos Truth, lies and the internet” The Internet is now the greatest source of information and misinformation for people living in the UK. At our fingertips lies both trustworthy journalism and selective half-truths, both niche expertise and general nonsense. This is asphyxiating as well as liberating. Too many people are unable to find the information they need, or trust the first thing they do. In this talk, Carl Miller, the Research Director for the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at Demos proposes the skill of ‘digital fluency’ as the key to how we all must react.

10th October 2012 Diana Laurillard, “IoE Teaching as a design science: developing reliable knowledge of learning technology” Teaching is changing. It is no longer simply about passing on knowledge to the next generation. Teachers in the 21st century, in all educational sectors, have to cope with an ever-changing cultural and technological environment. Teaching is now a design science, and teachers have to work out creative and evidence-based ways of improving what they do. The seminar will use the findings from a recent ESRC-EPSRC research project to show how the right learning design tools could help the professional teaching community develop reliable knowledge of how best to deploy whatever new kinds of digital technology become available to us.

21 March 2012: Prof Martin Weller “10 Digital Scholarship lessons in 10 videos” The advent of digital, networked and open technologies is impacting upon all aspects of scholarship. Drawing on his book The Digital Scholar, Martin Weller will present a number of lessons from research and experience across a range of disciplines. The talk will look at issues such as how is the nature of research changing, what new skills might be required, and what are the main issues?

2011/12

6 June 2012: Patrick Dunleavy, “The Republic of Blogs – a new phase in the development, democratization, critique and application of knowledge” After a long period of monopolising academic discourse, European universities went into decline as classical scholasticism, which was primarily inward and backward looking, gave way to the ideas of Enlightenment. Intellectual development moved outside the walled gardens of academia, because enlightenment thinkers shifted their various discourses into the realm of correspondence, creating a Republic of Letters. Prof. Dunleavy argues that we are currently experiencing a similar shift towards a Republic of Blogs that enlarges communication, debate and evidence beyond the halls of universities. Academic research is changing, academic publishing is moving towards a new paradigm of advancing ideas outside the confines of the traditional academic publishing model. Orthodox journals will soon be understood as tombstones: end of debate certificates. In particular: Micro-blogging is not only replacing traditional news media, but becoming a tool for finding and disseminating ideas and research (active research surveillance) Well edited blogs are becoming core communication tools and vehicles for HE debate; while the less traditional format encourages a writing style that invites debate from academics and lay persons alike, thus cutting across ranks, locations and academic status Working papers and online journals are now key, immediately accessible evidence and theory/methods development sources

9 May 2012: David White “I knew that the internet wouldn’t give me a wrong answer” Students are busy developing their own approaches to learning which take advantage of the abundance of information and new forms of collaboration online. Many of their ad hoc strategies are highly effective but are nevertheless frowned upon by an educational establishment which is struggling to adapt to the implications of the web. Drawing on findings from the Digital Visitors and Residents project, David White, from the University of Oxford, will discuss how the sheer convenience of the web is shifting what it means to learn (and to teach) back towards critical and creative thinking. You can find out more about the speaker from his blog: http://tallblog.conted.ox.ac.uk/index.php/author/whited/21 March 2012: Prof Martin Weller “10 Digital Scholarship lessons in 10 videos” The advent of digital, networked and open technologies is impacting upon all aspects of scholarship. Drawing on his book The Digital Scholar, Martin Weller will present a number of lessons from research and experience across a range of disciplines. The talk will look at issues such as how is the nature of research changing, what new skills might be required, and what are the main issues?25 January 2012:Professor John Naughton, “What do people really need to know about the Internet?” John Naughton Vice President of Wolfson College Cambridge, Professor of the Public Understanding of Technology, a writer, Observer columnist and prolific blogger. Follow @jjn1 on twitter The Internet has gone from being something ‘exotic’ to a mundane utility in the course of two decades. But there is abundant evidence that many people – including those whose livelihoods depend on it – do not understand it. This talk is based on the research that went into John’s new book – ‘From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: what you really need to know about the Internet’. The book will be published by Quercus Books on January 5th 2012.

2 November 2011: Dr Jane Secker & Dr Emma Coonan “Supporting undergraduate students of the future: developing a new curriculum for information literacy The first NetworkED seminar will present findings from a recent project that sought to understand the information needs of future undergraduate students. The researchers developed a revolutionary curriculum for information literacy that can be used with students to support their learning. Information literacy is widely recognised as a key part of lifelong independent learning – it relates to other new literacies such as media and digital literacy. The ability to find, evaluate, manage and use information in the digital age is a key skill for students linked to graduate employability, but many students struggle on entering higher education with the transition from dependent to independent learning. The curriculum provides a flexible framework of support that is intended to be adapted for specific disciplines and taught by a wide variety of people. The seminar will be a chance to find out more about the framework and to consider how it might impact on your own teaching and support.